The Unholy Three (1930) Review

Director: Jack Conway

Genre(s): Crime, Drama, Thriller

Runtime: 72 minutes

MPAA Rating: Not Rated

IMDb Page

Gather ’round, ladies and gentlemen, and hear Lon Chaney in his only role in a talking motion picture! Yes, Chaney made only one sound movie before tragically passing away from throat cancer at forty-seven. This is a remake of the 1925 film of the same title, so the plot may sound familiar: cross-dressing ventriloquist Echo (Lon Chaney), sideshow strongman Hercules (Ivan Linow), feisty little person Tweedledee (Harry Earles), and female pick-pocket Rosie O’Grady (Lila Lee) team up to plan some heists out of a pet shop.

This one is several minutes shorter than the silent original, so it chugs along at a slightly faster pace. The physical action is perhaps a tad more dynamic here, and, while it still has a courtroom finale, this one’s a hair more interesting. That being said, it’s very similar to the 1925 feature, so contrasting the two films isn’t easy.

The most notable flaw with this version of the story is that Harry Earles’ dialogue is frequently difficult to understand. Maybe silent movie-style intertitles were needed? Nah, I’m just kidding about that. The pacing probably could’ve been better, but, as it stands now, it’s an improvement over the original. It’s a preposterous, little movie, but it knows that it’s a little crazy.

Made during the Pre-Code era of Hollywood, before the enforcement of the Production Code, this nifty, slightly twisted crime-thriller is recommended for Lon Chaney fanatics…and not just because it was his last feature. It feels more streamlined than the 1925 silent film that it’s a remake of and the ludicrous premise is enough to keep it afloat. So, check out The Unholy Three if you ever get the chance.

My rating is 7 outta 10.

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