Breakout (1975) Review

Director: Tom Gries

Genre(s): Adventure, Crime, Thriller

Runtime: 96 minutes

MPAA Rating: PG

IMDb Page

According to the IMDb Trivia page for the prison-escape thriller Breakout, it was the first motion picture from a major studio whose release was accompanied by “the now-common saturation pattern.” This apparently means that the film opened in over a thousand American theaters simultaneously, while being backed by a barrage of 17,000 radio advertisements. All of this was in the service of a movie about a pilot named Nick Colton (Charles Bronson) who’s hired to rescue an innocent man – Jay Wagner (Robert Duvall) – from a Mexican fortress-prison.

This is actually a pretty lighthearted role for Charles Bronson, who has his wife Jill Ireland (playing Ann Wagner) co-star with him. His scenes are often pretty comedic and adventurous, meaning that he’s not scowling as much as he usually does. That being said, the light and dark elements don’t always completely mesh here (the oft-serious scenes involving Robert Duvall’s character sometimes feel like something out of a different movie).

Breakout probably doesn’t have as much action as you might expect from a Bronson flick from this time period, but that’s okay. There are a few moments of impressive stuntwork here. I mean, is Bronson actually helping fly that helicopter? It doesn’t look like phony-baloney rear projection to me. Another stunt that springs to mind is the one where a jeep overturns and bursts into flames, with stuntpeople barely missing the fire.

This is not top-tier Bronson right here (the actor takes a while to actually make his first appearance), but it’s watchable fluff. There are some minor pacing issues and it’s not exactly an action extravaganza, yet seeing Bronson play a less-melancholic-than-usual role might be worth the admission price for many. This is, believe it or not, just one of two films released in 1975 to be directed by Tom Gries, star Charles Bronson and Jill Ireland, and have its title begin with “Break.” The other is Breakheart Pass (1975).

My rating is 6 outta 10.

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