The Longest Day (1962) Review

Directors: Ken Annakin, Andrew Marton, Bernhard Wicki, Gerd Oswalt (uncredited), and Darryl F. Zanuck (uncredited)

Genre(s): Action, War

Runtime: 178 minutes

MPAA Rating: G

IMDb Page

Featuring innumerable big-name stars in its cast, The Longest Day is a true cinematic epic. In this three-hour colossus, the story of the D-Day landings at Normandy during World War II are told from the American, British, French, and Nazi German points-of-view. According to IMDb, this film had five directors (two of whom were apparently uncredited), which shows what a logistical nightmare making the movie must’ve been.

The Longest Day is a reverent motion picture (frequently reminding the audience of the importance of the invasion, often through speechy dialogue), but it has a fair amount of humor, too. Fleshing out the film’s countless characters is not this flick’s strong point. One doesn’t really get to know these guys (and gals) too well. Characters just come and go (how long does it take for Henry Fonda’s character, Theodore Roosevelt, Jr., to be introduced anyway?). For this reason, I can’t really describe this movie as a drama, though it still delivers a satisfactory emotional payoff.

The real focus of The Longest Day is on its exquisite battle and combat scenes, and, boy, are there a lot of them. They’re all so well-choreographed that it’s difficult to choose one that works best. It should be noted that one of the action sequences features a highly spectacular long take that really shows off the picture’s budget. The battles are pretty bloodless, though, not being nearly as gruesome as those shown in Saving Private Ryan (1998), which covers some similar ground. There are some anti-war touches, but the tone is generally more heroic.

Bolstered by grand cinematography and a good musical score from Maurice Jarre, The Longest Day is a more-than-worthy depiction of the events that went down on the Western Front of World War II on June 6, 1944. For a three-hour movie, it’s very well-paced (and certainly never boring) and features a ton of action. In fact, the first time I watched this flick, I thought it had too much combat at the expense of character growth. I’ve changed my mind a bit since then, considering it’s really not that kind of movie. It’s all about spectacle.

My rating is 8 outta 10.

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