King Kong (1933) Review

Directors: Merian C. Cooper and Ernest B. Schoedsack

Genre(s): Action, Adventure, Fantasy

Runtime: 100 minutes (standard version), 104 minutes (restored version)

MPAA Rating: Not Rated

IMDb Page

One of the best monster movies ever made, King Kong is a highly ambitious film that, once it gets going, piles on the special effects and action. A film crew led by famed director Carl Denham (Robert Armstrong) is out shooting a new picture on an uncharted, tropical island when they discover a massive gorilla named Kong that’s worshiped by the local natives. Made during Hollywood’s Pre-Code era (prior to the Production Code being enforced), this is one sweet ride.

King Kong is very reliant on special effects, and, in all fairness, they probably won’t be mistaken for realistic by modern audiences. Still, they’re spectacular and imaginative, being far more fun to watch than computer-generated imagery (CGI). There’s something exciting about watching an effect that exists in the real world, as opposed to one that only exists in a computer screen. After a somewhat slow opening, the flick really takes off once Kong arrives. From then on, it’s almost non-stop action. This has to be one of the first of the throw-everything-at-the-audience-except-the-kitchen-sink action pictures.

Max Steiner’s musical score is awesome and vigorous. The film’s emotional component is often overstated, although Kong still manages to elicit sympathy from the viewers. For the most part, though, he’s a vicious killing machine. Ann Darrow (Fay Wray) is screaming almost constantly throughout the movie. It’s not a bad thing, and the howls of other characters amplify the film’s considerable violence. The depiction of Skull Island’s natives may be problematic for some. I wouldn’t call it outright racist, but it is stereotypical and patronizing.

Impressively massive in scale, King Kong serves as an early special effects extravaganza. Be patient with the picture’s introductory scenes and you’ll be rewarded with a one-of-a-kind action-adventure treat. It’s still a remarkably worthwhile movie, even if the effects aren’t exactly life-like.

My rating is 8 outta 10.

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